Depot Doings: Guntersville, AL / Decherd, TN / Murfreesboro, TN / Nashville, TN / Tullahoma, TN / Winchester, TN

Featured NC&StL Railway depots for this December post include various locations in Alabama and Tennessee:

  • NC&StL Depot – Guntersville, AL – Date unknown
  • NC&StL Depot – Decherd, TN – 1978
  • NC&StL Depot – Murfreesboro, TN – Date unknown
  • NC&StL Depot – Nashville, TN – Date unknown
  • NC&StL Depot – Tullahoma, TN – 1978
  • NC&StL Depot – Winchester, TN – 1978

All photos courtesy of DepotMaps.com and Tom Rock.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Depot Doings: Askov, MN / Breckenridge, MN / Libby, MT / Fargo, ND / Williston, ND

Featured Great Northern Railway depots this month are those in Minnesota, Montana, and North Dakota:

Askov, MNThe Askov depot was built circa 1894 by the Great Northern Railroad.  The combination depot was the typical design in small communities along the line.  The depot has been retired and is now part of the Pine County Historical Society Museum.  The tracks behind the depot remain active for the BNSF Railroad.

Breckenridge, MNBuilt in 1901 by the Great Northern Railroad, the depot currently serves as a division office for the short line Red River Valley and Western Railroad.

Libby, MTThe Libby depot built by the Great Northern Railway opened May 3, 1892.  It resembles a Swiss chalet with its romantic architecture.  Amtrak currently serves the depot.  In addition to a waiting room, a portion of the building is also used by BNSF Railway as a storage/staging area.

Fargo, NDFargo Station was originally built by the Great Northern Railway in 1920.  At the time of the station’s construction, Fargo was served by both the Great Northern Railway and the Northern Pacific.[2] The station was served by Great Northern trains, while Northern Pacific operated its own station along Fargo’s Main Avenue.  In 1970, the two railway companies merged to form the Burlington Northern. Freight trains used the Northern Pacific tracks, while passenger trains used the Great Northern tracks. All passenger service in Fargo began using the Great Northern depot. From 1971, passenger service was operated by Amtrak.[3]  Amtrak currently uses the former BNSF freight house as the station building, as the main building became unused in 1986. The former main station building is now used for retail. Various businesses have operated in the building, since 1995.[3] 

Williston, NDWilliston is a train station in Williston, North Dakota, served by Amtrak‘s Empire Builder line. The brick station was built in 1910 by the Great Northern Railway[2] and is located at the southern end of Williston’s downtown. An interior and exterior restoration, begun in 2010 and costing almost $2 million, has returned the station to its original look.[2]   With the recent opening of new oil fields in North Dakota in the 21st century, many oil production workers now also board and detrain in Williston, adding additional passengers to the route. Ridership at the station had a particular spike in Amtrak’s 2012 fiscal year, when ridership grew by almost 82 percent to 54,324 from 29,920 the year before (though 2011 ridership had been partly degraded due to flooding along the route).[3][4] Patronage tapered off in 2013 and 2014, however, partly due to worsening on-time reliability of the train during that period.[5][6] Until the end of fiscal 2016, Williston had been North Dakota’s busiest Amtrak station, and it had held that position since 2011 or earlier. It is still the state’s second-busiest station, behind Minot.

All photos courtesy of DepotMaps.com; historical data courtesy of Wikipedia and DepotMaps.com.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Depot Doings: Bridgeport, AL / Blue Ridge, GA / Chatsworth, GA / Murphy, NC / Decherd, TN / Tullahoma, TN

Featured L&N Railway depots for this October post include various locations in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee:

  • L&N Depot – Bridgeport, AL – 1980
  • L&N Depot – Blue Ridge, GA – 1981
  • L&N Depot – Chatsworth, GA – 1980
  • L&N Depot – Murphy, NC – 1978
  • L&N Depot – Decherd, TN – 1978
  • L&N Depot – Tullahoma, TN – 1978

All photos courtesy of Tom Rock.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Chattanooga Choo-Choo History

TERMINAL STATION – CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE

A challenge went out in 1900 by the architectural students at Beaux Arts Institute in Paris, France.  The students offered themselves a prize for the best plans which could be drawn up for a railroad station that would suit the needs of a large city.  The winner of the prize was Mr. Don Barber, an American from New York City.

In 1904, when the president of the Southern Railway decided to build a new passenger terminal in Chattanooga, one architect who offered an entry was none other than the same Mr. Barber.  When Southern Railway’s president saw Barber’s design, he was very much impressed.  He said he felt the exterior plans were perfect but asked Barber if he could possibly alter the interior design.  Upon this request, the Grand Dome was created.  It is completely free standing and rests on four major steel supports 75 feet apart.  The dome’s underside, which covered the 68 by 82 foot general waiting room, was decorated in artistic plaster embellishments of heraldic emblems.  For those nocturnal passengers who would frequent this 24 hour station, illumination was provided by four ornate brass chandeliers, each containing 40 lights and each centered by an 18-inch opal globe.  When these lights were on, the dome was truly lavish in its different prismatic colors.

On a bitterly cold winter morning, December 1, 1909, a crowd of several hundred gathered in the 1400 block of Market Street for the dedication of Chattanooga’s Terminal Station.  After serving Chattanooga for 61 years, the Southern Railway closed the building August 11, 1970.  It was purchased, restored, and reopened to the public in April 1973 and entered on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Dept. of Interior on January 25, 1974.

On March 5, 1880, the first passenger train connecting the north with the south traveled from Cincinnati, Ohio south to Chattanooga, Tennessee on the first municipal railroad, the Cincinnati Southern Line.  A reporter dubbed the train the “Chattanooga Choo-Choo,” and Big Band leader Glenn Miller and the Modernaires immortalized this legendary train in song May 7, 1941.

When the Southern Railway closed this magnificent architectural icon on August 11, 1970, a piece of Chattanooga was forever lost.  Thankfully, it was spared the wrecking ball as so many others were not as fortunate.  These following photos surely tell a story of a more pristine time–a time when traveling by rail was so much more relaxing compared to today.  Hopefully, these photos will stir many a long lost memory.

Photo Credit: Copyright 2009, Justin W. Strickland, “Images of Rail – Chattanooga’s Terminal Station.”

Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Depot Doings: LaCrosse, IN / Benton Harbor, MI / Breckinridge, MI / Greenville, MI / Newaygo, MI / Barboursville, WV / Marlinton, WV

Featured Chesapeake & Ohio depots on the blog this month are those in Indiana, Michigan, and West Virginia:

  • C&O Depot – LaCrosse, IN – 10/11/75
  • C&O Depot – Benton Harbor, MI – 6/9/73
  • C&O Depot – Breckinridge, MI – 5/81
  • C&O Depot – Greenville, MI – 5/5/83
  • C&O Depot – Newaygo, MI – 11/6/86
  • C&O Depot – Barboursville, WV – 8/2/84
  • C&O Depot – Marlinton, WV – 6/79

All photos courtesy of Old Time Trains.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

 

Depot Doings: Carlyle, IL / East Salmanca, NY / Deshler, OH / Fostoria, OH / Eidenau, PA / Evans City, PA

Featured Baltimore & Ohio Railway depots on the blog this month are those in Illinois, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania:

  • B&O Depot – Carlyle, IL – 10/29/86
  • B&O Depot – East Salmanca, NY – 8/86
  • B&O Depot – Deshler, OH – 9/13/12
  • B&O Depot – Fostoria, OH – 7/16/12
  • B&O Depot – Eidenau, PA – 10/64
  • B&O Depot – Evans City, PA – 7/24/63

All photos courtesy of www.rr-fallenflags.org.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

 

Detroit’s Michigan Central Station Restoration

Video courtesy of Click On Detroit | Local 4 | WDIV via YouTube.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.