Chattanooga Choo-Choo History

TERMINAL STATION – CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE

A challenge went out in 1900 by the architectural students at Beaux Arts Institute in Paris, France.  The students offered themselves a prize for the best plans which could be drawn up for a railroad station that would suit the needs of a large city.  The winner of the prize was Mr. Don Barber, an American from New York City.

In 1904, when the president of the Southern Railway decided to build a new passenger terminal in Chattanooga, one architect who offered an entry was none other than the same Mr. Barber.  When Southern Railway’s president saw Barber’s design, he was very much impressed.  He said he felt the exterior plans were perfect but asked Barber if he could possibly alter the interior design.  Upon this request, the Grand Dome was created.  It is completely free standing and rests on four major steel supports 75 feet apart.  The dome’s underside, which covered the 68 by 82 foot general waiting room, was decorated in artistic plaster embellishments of heraldic emblems.  For those nocturnal passengers who would frequent this 24 hour station, illumination was provided by four ornate brass chandeliers, each containing 40 lights and each centered by an 18-inch opal globe.  When these lights were on, the dome was truly lavish in its different prismatic colors.

On a bitterly cold winter morning, December 1, 1909, a crowd of several hundred gathered in the 1400 block of Market Street for the dedication of Chattanooga’s Terminal Station.  After serving Chattanooga for 61 years, the Southern Railway closed the building August 11, 1970.  It was purchased, restored, and reopened to the public in April 1973 and entered on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Dept. of Interior on January 25, 1974.

On March 5, 1880, the first passenger train connecting the north with the south traveled from Cincinnati, Ohio south to Chattanooga, Tennessee on the first municipal railroad, the Cincinnati Southern Line.  A reporter dubbed the train the “Chattanooga Choo-Choo,” and Big Band leader Glenn Miller and the Modernaires immortalized this legendary train in song May 7, 1941.

When the Southern Railway closed this magnificent architectural icon on August 11, 1970, a piece of Chattanooga was forever lost.  Thankfully, it was spared the wrecking ball as so many others were not as fortunate.  These following photos surely tell a story of a more pristine time–a time when traveling by rail was so much more relaxing compared to today.  Hopefully, these photos will stir many a long lost memory.

Photo Credit: Copyright 2009, Justin W. Strickland, “Images of Rail – Chattanooga’s Terminal Station.”

Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Depot Doings: Carlyle, IL / East Salmanca, NY / Deshler, OH / Fostoria, OH / Eidenau, PA / Evans City, PA

Featured Baltimore & Ohio Railway depots on the blog this month are those in Illinois, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania:

  • B&O Depot – Carlyle, IL – 10/29/86
  • B&O Depot – East Salmanca, NY – 8/86
  • B&O Depot – Deshler, OH – 9/13/12
  • B&O Depot – Fostoria, OH – 7/16/12
  • B&O Depot – Eidenau, PA – 10/64
  • B&O Depot – Evans City, PA – 7/24/63

All photos courtesy of www.rr-fallenflags.org.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

 

Depot Doings: Framingham, MA / Galion, OH / Mackinaw City, MI / Muncie, IN / Chatham, NY / Elkhart, IN / Bucyrus, OH / Sandusky, OH

Featured New York Central depots on the blog this month are those in Massachusetts, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and New York:

  • NYC Depot – Framingham, MA – 2/29/00
  • NYC Depot – Galion, OH – 12/22/78
  • NYC Depot – Mackinaw City, MI – 9/1/78
  • NYC Depot – Muncie, IN – 5/8/88
  • NYC Depot – Chatham, NY – 8/96
  • NYC Depot – Elkhart, IN – 9/21/01
  • NYC Depot – Bucyrus, OH – 10/4/13
  • NYC Depot – Sandusky, OH – 10/4/13

All photos courtesy of Railroad Picture Archives.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

 

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam Feature for January 2018

Featured Pennsylvania Railroad steam subjects for this January post include various locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Ohio:

  • PRR #1429 – Renovo, PA – 8/18/56
  • PRR #1644 – Camden, NJ – 10/7/53
  • PRR #2796 – East Altoona, PA – 9/16/55
  • PRR #4330 – Shamokin, PA – 8/17/56
  • PRR #5548 – Harrisburg, PA – 7/49
  • PRR #6494 – Columbus, OH – 8/14/56

All photos courtesy of Mr. John Dziobko, Jr., GodFatherRails.com.


Rock on Trains © 2018, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Louisville & Nashville Railway Steam Feature for October 2017

Featured Louisville & Nashville Railway steam subjects for this October post include various locations in Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee:

  • L&N #407 – Evansville, IN – 10/40
  • L&N #409 – Cincinnati, OH – 10/49
  • L&N #419 – Cincinnati, OH – 4/37
  • L&N #421 – Etowah, TN – 5/31
  • L&N #1961 – Location Unknown

All photos courtesy of Ron’s Rec Room and American-Rails.com.


Rock on Trains © 2017, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

Depot Doings: Catlettsburg, KY / Jenkins, KY / Fostoria, OH / Mineral, VA / Durbin, WV / Alderson, WV

Featured Chesapeake & Ohio Railway depots this month are those in Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia:

  • Catlettsburg, KY – 11/13/10
  • Jenkins, KY – 8/1/78
  • Fostoria, OH – 1/1/73
  • Mineral, VA – 10/30/13
  • Durbin, WV – 8/12/73
  • Alderson, WV – 6/27/07

All photos courtesy of Railroad Picture Archives.


Rock on Trains © 2017, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.

 

 

 

Nickel Plate Road Steam Feature for June 2017

Featured Nickel Plate Road steam subjects for this post are Berkshire locomotives in various Ohio and Illinois locations:

  • NKP #715 – Conneaut, OH – 1/1/60
  • NKP #744 – Chicago, IL – 6/6/58
  • NKP #750 – Chicago, IL – 1956
  • NKP #757 – Bellevue, OH – Date unknown
  • NKP #771 – Ohio – Late 1950’s
  • NKP #779 – Location & date unknown

The Class A-1 Berkshire is a 2-8-4 steam locomotive first built in 1925 by the Lima Locomotive Works. The design was initially intended to improve on the company’s USRA Mikado design (2-8-2), which was deemed to lack sufficient speed and horsepower. This was addressed by the inclusion of a larger, 100-square foot firebox that required an extra trailing axle, giving the locomotive its distinctive 2-8-4 wheel arrangement.

The Berkshire locomotive was so named for its testing location on the Berkshire Hills of the Boston & Albany Railroad. After the Class A-1 successfully outperformed a Class H-10 Mikado, the Boston & Albany Railroad became the first to order the new Berkshires. Over 600 were built by Lima Locomotive Works, the American Locomotive Company and Baldwin Locomotive Works. A total of nineteen different railroads purchased Berkshires, including the Erie Railroad, who owned 105 Berkshires, more than any other railroad; the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway, who nicknamed theirs the Kanawhas, and the Louisville & Nashville Railroad’s, whose locomotives were technically designed as Class M-1 but were referred to as “Big Emmas.”

Editor’s Note: Over the years, there has been quite a bit of speculation as to the immense power generated by a steam locomotive. In the attached link, Mr. Rich Melvin’s interview will interject some perspective on this long sought after answer.

 

All photos courtesy of Google; history excerpt courtesy of Wikipedia; video courtesy of Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society via YouTube.


Rock on Trains © 2017, Tom Rock + T.D.R. Productions. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Tom Rock is strictly prohibited.